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KC Dem Club: Amy Anderson, KEA Waterkeeper Program

KEA Waterkeepers

Water, water, everywhere,/  Nor any drop to drink.”
The Rime of the Ancient Mariner

Lake Coeur d’Aene Waterkeepers

Lake Coeur d’Alene is one of our region’s most precious resources. Unfortunately, despite its pristine appearance, this unique fresh-water lake is under threat. Although you can’t see it, the lake bottom contains tons of heavy metals. Decades of ore extraction in the Silver Valley deposited this toxic layer of sludge. Now, the growing demands of our area’s fast-growing population further threaten water quality. Fortunately, the Lake Coeur d’Alene Waterkeepers are working to protect against threats to this vital public water resource. Come hear Amy Anderson, the Kootenai Environmental Alliance’s Environmental Programs Manager, talk about the Waterkeepers program and how they are safeguarding this magnificent water resource.

About Amy Anderson

Amy Anderson has degrees from the University of Idaho in the fields of Ecology & Conservation Biology, Wildlife Biology and Rangeland Ecology. Amy currently wears many hats for the organization: however, her main focus is the Lake Coeur d’Alene Waterkeeper program. The Lake Coeur d’Alene Waterkeeper became part of the national Waterkeeper Alliance in 2014. The program serves as an on-the-water advocate working to ensure that Lake Coeur d’Alene is swimmable, fishable and drinkable. The Lake Cd’A Waterkeeper program protects against threats to the area’s watershed. Their work includes enforcement, community action, education, restoration and advocacy.

About the KEA

Kootenai Environmental Alliance is the oldest non-profit conservation group in Idaho and one of the oldest in the Northwest. The organization was founded in 1972, by former Idaho State Senators Art Manley and Mary Lou Reed, well-known environmental attorney Scott Reed, and representatives from several local and regional sporting organizations. KEA was organized in response to the extensive environmental damage in the Idaho Panhandle at the time caused by timber and mining interests, land developers, and policies of land managers of the federal government.

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